Trilobites and Trilobite Accessories

An Undergraduate Research Attempt

fossilera:

This is a killer example of a rare spiny trilobite from Morocco, Kolihapeltis rabatensis. It’s laid out perfectly prone and at 2 1/4 inches is quite large for the species. The preparation on this specimen is very good with the long spines prepared out free-standing. This is one of the finer specimens of this species you’ll see. 
Just added for sale at FossilEra.com

fossilera:

This is a killer example of a rare spiny trilobite from Morocco, Kolihapeltis rabatensis. It’s laid out perfectly prone and at 2 1/4 inches is quite large for the species. The preparation on this specimen is very good with the long spines prepared out free-standing. This is one of the finer specimens of this species you’ll see. 

Just added for sale at FossilEra.com

The Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology is basically the Bible for what we are doing.  It contains figures, drawn to scale, of type specimens of different trilobite genera, so if there’s a taxon we want to study but we don’t have a specimen ourselves, we can literally measure a picture of it from this book and then we’ll have some data to work with.  Plus it has a ton of information about the discovery and naming of the taxon, and where the type species is and defining characteristics of the taxon.  It’s extremely interesting and extremely useful.

The Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology is basically the Bible for what we are doing.  It contains figures, drawn to scale, of type specimens of different trilobite genera, so if there’s a taxon we want to study but we don’t have a specimen ourselves, we can literally measure a picture of it from this book and then we’ll have some data to work with.  Plus it has a ton of information about the discovery and naming of the taxon, and where the type species is and defining characteristics of the taxon.  It’s extremely interesting and extremely useful.

olenoides:

This is a odd Devonian trilobite Psychopyge elegans with a distinctive long rostrum coming off of it’s head.  It’s over 4 1/2 inches long and has been expertly prepared with all of the rows of tiny spines free standing as well as the genal spines.
Source: FossilEra.com

olenoides:

This is a odd Devonian trilobite Psychopyge elegans with a distinctive long rostrum coming off of it’s head.  It’s over 4 1/2 inches long and has been expertly prepared with all of the rows of tiny spines free standing as well as the genal spines.

Source: FossilEra.com

I got pictures of us taking pictures!  That’s the camera we’re using and we’re testing out settings on a neat little gastropod shell.

ACCA and Things to Come

I suppose I never really did talk about ACCA, but that might be because ACCA came and went in a blur for me.  The overall conference was great.  I got to drive out closer to where I live and set up our giant poster and then pretty much just stand there and wait for people to ask us questions.  It wasn’t at all like the other conference where we had to make a presentation about our topic.  We could have if we wanted to, but I had a time constraint that I was under, so we didn’t really have a chance to do that.  I did get to see some of my friends present their research at the earlier talk time slots, though, so that was very nice.  But overall we had quite a turnout.  Lots of people came by and looked, and a lot of professors there were really interested in what we had done.  As far as I could tell, we were the only paleontological research there, so that was pretty cool too.  I couldn’t stay nearly as long as I liked, but nevertheless it was a really great experience that I’m glad I got the chance to attend.

Now for the rest of the semester.  We’re essentially done with the hard research, which is kind of a bummer, because that means we’re almost done with everything.  But now we basically have low priority, more fun things to play around with.  The first task that I have is to find more articles that talk about the functional morphology of trilobites, which essentially means that I need to investigate studies that have been already done to see what conclusions can be drawn to connect what a trilobite looks like to how it lived.  So that gives me some fun things to look into and also probably post here.  The other cool thing that we get to do is play around with a super expensive camera and go nuts taking pictures of fossils so more measurements can be made for future investigations.  So that’s gonna be pretty fun and it’ll also give me some cool things to put on there.  Right now, we’re just learning to use the camera, but later this week I’m gonna go into the lab and get a few good photo shoots in.  Until then, I’m gonna be buried deep in journals.  Not that I’m really complaining.

olenoides:

This has got to be one of the most visually stunning trilobites in the world, a large Quadrops flexuosa. This bizarre trilobite has a distinctive four-forked protrusion coming off of the front of it’s head which is where the genus gets it’s name. It also has nearly 50 free standing spines that have individually been prepared free of the hard surrounding matrix.
Image Source: http://www.fossilera.com/fossils/premium-trilobite-quadrops-flexuosa

olenoides:

This has got to be one of the most visually stunning trilobites in the world, a large Quadrops flexuosa. This bizarre trilobite has a distinctive four-forked protrusion coming off of the front of it’s head which is where the genus gets it’s name. It also has nearly 50 free standing spines that have individually been prepared free of the hard surrounding matrix.

Image Source: http://www.fossilera.com/fossils/premium-trilobite-quadrops-flexuosa

olenoides:

This huge enrolled Drotops armatus trilobite looks almost like a spiny Pac Man.  Trilobites enrolled for defensive purposes and combined with the porcupine like nature of this species it would have given any predators a nasty surprise.  Also notice the compound eyes which were made out of calcite.
This spectacular specimen is from the Mrakib, Morocco.
Image Source: http://www.fossilera.com/fossils/drotops-armatus

olenoides:

This huge enrolled Drotops armatus trilobite looks almost like a spiny Pac Man.  Trilobites enrolled for defensive purposes and combined with the porcupine like nature of this species it would have given any predators a nasty surprise.  Also notice the compound eyes which were made out of calcite.

This spectacular specimen is from the Mrakib, Morocco.

Image Source: http://www.fossilera.com/fossils/drotops-armatus

Conferences Come and Gone

I’m gonna be putting up some pictures of my presentations at the various conferences I’ve been at this semester, I just need to get them from the people who have them.  More details/info/babbling to come soon!